Has Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos recovered from the seabed rockets that launched Apollo 11's historic 1969 mission to the moon?



Amazon's billionaire boss Jeff Bezos 
has recovered what he believes could be the historic rocket motors that
took man to the moon.


Bezos
funded the expedition to use a robotic submarine to recover the engines
from an Apollo mission from three miles below the surface of the sea.


The team found and recovered engines - but have so far been unable to confirm which mission they were used on.

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One of the the corroded F-1 engines from Apollo's Saturn V rocket, which sat more than 4 kilometers below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean



One of the the corroded F-1 engines from
Apollo's Saturn V rocket, which sat more than 4 kilometers below the
surface of the Atlantic Ocean







The engines were discovered on the seabed using a robotic submarine - and were today recovered



The engines were discovered on the seabed using a robotic submarine - and were today recovered



Jeff Bezos also has his own exploration firm, Bezos Expeditions, which made the discovery. He also runs Blue Origin, a rocket firm



Jeff Bezos also has his own exploration firm,
Bezos Expeditions, which made the discovery. He also runs Blue Origin, a
rocket firm


Revealing the find, Bezos hailed the discovery as an incredible discovery.

'What an incredible adventure,' he wrote on the Bezos Expeditions site.

'We
are right now onboard the Seabed Worker headed back to Cape Canaveral
after finishing three weeks at sea, working almost 3 miles below the
surface.


'We found so much.







'We’ve seen an underwater
wonderland – an incredible sculpture garden of twisted F-1 engines that
tells the story of a fiery and violent end, one that serves testament to
the Apollo program.


'We photographed many beautiful objects in situ and have now recovered many prime pieces.

'Each
piece we bring on deck conjures for me the thousands of engineers who
worked together back then to do what for all time had been thought
surely impossible.'


However, much to the teams disappointment, they have so far been unable to identify which mission the rockets were used on.

It
is hoped they could be the F-1 engines on Apollo's Saturn V rocket
dropped into the Atlantic minutes after they launched astronauts Neil
Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins on their historic voyage to
the moon.





The turbine from one of the F1 rocket motors found by Amazon's billionaire boss



The turbine from one of the F1 rocket motors found by Amazon's billionaire boss







A battered heat exchanger from one of the 1969 missions



A battered heat exchanger from one of the 1969 missions





A rocket nozzle on the seabed, surrounded by fish



A rocket nozzle on the seabed, surrounded by fish




THE APOLLO ROCKETS



More than 40 years later, the Saturn V remains the largest and most powerful engine ever built.


Each
of its five 12-foot F-1 engines is capable of generating about 32
million horsepower, burning 6,000 pounds of
rocket grade kerosene and liquid oxygen every second.


'Many of the original serial numbers
are missing or partially missing, which is going to make mission
identification difficult,' admitted Bezos.


'We might see more during restoration.

'The objects themselves are gorgeous.'

The
team used a Remotely Operated Vehicles worked at a depth of more than
14,000 feet, tethered to the mothership ship with fiber optics for data
and electric cables transmitting power at more than 4,000 volts.


'We on the team were often struck by poetic echoes of the lunar missions.

'The buoyancy of the ROVs looks every bit like microgravity.

'The blackness of the horizon, the gray and colorless ocean floor.

'Only the occasional deep sea fish broke the illusion.'

The team hope to eventually display the motors.




A gas generator and manifold from one of the rocket motors



A gas generator and manifold from one of the rocket motors







One of the Saturn V Stage Structures used to hold the components together, pictured on the seabed



One of the Saturn V Stage Structures used to hold the components together, pictured on the seabed


'We’re bringing home enough major components to fashion displays of two flown F-1 engines,' Besoz claimed.

'The upcoming restoration will stabilize the hardware and prevent further corrosion.

'We
want the hardware to tell its true story, including its 5,000 mile per
hour re-entry and subsequent impact with the ocean surface.


'We’re excited to get this hardware on display where just maybe it will inspire something amazing.'

Nasa hailed the find as historic.

'Nearly
one year ago, Jeff Bezos shared with us his plans to recover F-1
engines that helped power Apollo astronauts to the moon in the late
1960s and early 1970s,' said
NASA Administrator Charles Bolden.




Apollo II



Groundbreaking: NASA's mighty Saturn V rocket was used to launch the historic Apollo 11














'We share the excitement expressed by
Jeff and his team in announcing the recovery of two of the powerful
Saturn V first-stage engines from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.



'This is a historic find and I
congratulate the team for its determination and perseverance in the
recovery of these important artifacts of our first efforts to send
humans beyond Earth orbit.



'We look forward to the restoration
of these engines by the Bezos team and applaud Jeff's desire to make
these historic artifacts available for public display.



'Jeff and his colleagues at Blue
Origin are helping to usher in a new commercial era of space exploration
and we are confident our continued collaboration will soon result in
private human access to space, creating jobs and driving America's
leadership in innovation and exploration.'


The F-1 engines on Apollo's Saturn V
rocket dropped into the Atlantic Ocean minutes after they launched
astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins on their
historic voyage to the moon.



More than 40 years later, the Saturn V remains the largest and most powerful engine ever built, according to space.com.


Each
of its five 12-foot F-1 engines is capable of generating about 32
million horsepower, burning 6,000 pounds of rocket fuel every second.



Bezos
says on his website that as a five-year-old he watched in amazement as
Apollo II launched into space, but a short time ago did he begin to
wonder about the rockets.



'A
year or so ago, I started to wonder, with the right team of undersea
pros, could we find and potentially recover the F-1 engines that started
mankind's mission to the moon?' Bezos wrote on his website.



Bezos
acknowledges the engines belong to NASA and hopes that one day they
will be displayed at the Smithsonian and perhaps at the Museum of Flight
in his native Seattle.


His statement concludes: 'NASA is one of the few institutions I know that can inspire 5-year-olds.

'It sure inspired me, and with this endeavor, maybe we can inspire a few
more youth to invent and explore.'






The Apollo 11 Saturn V



The Apollo 11 Saturn V launched Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins on their historic voyage to the moon








Exhibit: A Saturn V like the one used in the launch of Apollo 11 draws crowds to the Kennedy Space Center



Exhibit: A Saturn V like the one used in the launch of Apollo 11 draws crowds to the Kennedy Space Center


The Apollo 11 is Bezos' second space-centred project.


Blue
Origin, his spaceflight company partially funded by NASA, is developing
a commercial spaceship capable of flying people to and from the Earth's
orbit.


This mission is just the latest in a long line of exploration attempts launched by deep-pocketed adventurers.

Last
week film director James Cameron dived to the furthest depths of the
Pacific, while Virgin founder Richard Branson is hoping to start the
world's first commercial 'space airline'.





Inspiring: Bezos says the Apollo programme was an inspiration to him when he was a child



Inspiring: Bezos says the Apollo programme was an inspiration to him when he was a child


  1. 2013/03/21(木) 15:54:08|
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